Corvina grapes

Corvina is a red grape variety indigenous to the Italian peninsula. Sometimes referred as Corvina Veronese or Cruina, these are mainly grown in the Veneto region of northeast Italy. It is also produced in Valpolicella and Bardolino that adjoin Veneto.

Wines with Corvina grapes

Since this is a red grape variety, its flavours range from fruity to a mixture of sweet-almond tinge. Corvina grapes are also used in a lot of blends, notable wines like Bardolino and Valpolicella that have a range of grape blends from Rondinella, Rossiglona and Molinara.

Recent research has actually shown Corvina to be a relative of many other grape varieties notable the Rondinella grape, that is another red grape variety indigenous to Italy.

Origins and history

Corvina grapes are an ancient variety, with a history as volatile as it has been for the Veneto region itself.

This region has seen countless regime changes and organised invasions in the past. Once controlled by the Greeks, the region got overrun by the Romans during its expanding era till the onset of the middle ages when countless barbaric and gothic tribes settled here.

The Habsburg era saw countless exchange of governments with Austria in the north, Italian kingdoms to the south, of course the Venetian republic and major incursion by Ottoman Turks from the Balkans during their zenith.

Corvina grape wines have thus seen a lot of modifications and changes that are reflected in the current era.

First noted by Cassiodoro, magistrate to the Visigoth leader Theodorus, he described the wine made from this grape as ‘sweet’. Historians suggest that the wine that Cassiodoro drank was most probably an earlier version of Amarone and Recioto that are still produced in this region.

Valpolicella itself is a combination of ancient Greek and Latin meaning ‘wine from cellars’.

The grape continued to flourish and gained much popularity with the help of adjoining centre of trade of Europe – Venice where it spread to rest of Italy and some parts of Mediterranean, until the Phylloxera epidemic struck.

In the 19th century, this epidemic destroyed almost all of Italian vineyards and some grapes even faced extinction.

Corvina faced a lot of threat during this time and it was only through chance that some survived.

Post end of the epidemic saw gradual development in its production process, specifically in the 1950s when Corvina wines like Rocioto and Amarone saw movements to popularise them.

Remember to read the Wine Tasting guide…

.

Origins and history

Corvina grapes are an ancient variety, with a history as volatile as it has been for the Veneto region itself.

This region has seen countless regime changes and organised invasions in the past. Once controlled by the Greeks, the region got overrun by the Romans during its expanding era till the onset of the middle ages when countless barbaric and gothic tribes settled here.

The Habsburg era saw countless exchange of governments with Austria in the north, Italian kingdoms to the south, of course the Venetian republic and major incursion by Ottoman Turks from the Balkans during their zenith.

Corvina grape wines have thus seen a lot of modifications and changes that are reflected in the current era.

First noted by Cassiodoro, magistrate to the Visigoth leader Theodorus, he described the wine made from this grape as ‘sweet’. Historians suggest that the wine that Cassiodoro drank was most probably an earlier version of Amarone and Recioto that are still produced in this region.

Valpolicella itself is a combination of ancient Greek and Latin meaning ‘wine from cellars’.

The grape continued to flourish and gained much popularity with the help of adjoining centre of trade of Europe – Venice where it spread to rest of Italy and some parts of Mediterranean, until the Phylloxera epidemic struck.

In the 19th century, this epidemic destroyed almost all of Italian vineyards and some grapes even faced extinction.

Corvina faced a lot of threat during this time and it was only through chance that some survived.

Post end of the epidemic saw gradual development in its production process, specifically in the 1950s when Corvina wines like Rocioto and Amarone saw movements to popularise them.

Complimentary foods

Like most other red grape varieties, the Corvina is a sweet and an alcoholic variety.

Most wines produced by this grape are a mix of fruit and strong flavoured blends that can be used well in cooking and as a complimentary beverage with mainstream Italian dishes.

Grab a Risotto and a glassful of Armone wine and you have a perfect lunch with friends and family.

Use it for some cooking to make desserts that have that certain ‘wine flavour in them’.

Author

Michael Bredahl

Michael Bredahl

Wine Writer

I have been online since it all began, with blogging and creating websites. Drinking wine, and writing about them, are one of my passions. Remember to drink responsibly 🙂

Are you a Copywriter?

We have a lot of articles without much content, if you can do it better, you are welcome to write a nice article, and get the proper credit for that. Read more information about beeing an author, and Contact us for more information.

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Vineyards
Breweries
Alcohol and Distilleries
Wine Grape Varieties
Wine Informations
Wine Merchants
Accessories
Other
Bar and Cocktail Equipment
Bottle Opener
Glassware
Wine Accessories
Wine Opener
Alcohol Free
Beer
Ale
Brown Ale
Chinese Beer
Christmas Beer
Czech Beer
Danish Beer
English Beer
Finnish Beer
German Beer
Iceland Beer
Indian Pale Ale
Italian Beer
Japanese Beer
Lager
Mexican beer
Pale Ale
Seasonal Beer
Stout
Swedish Beer
Turkish Beer
Wheat Beer
White Ale
Champagne
French Champagne
Cocktail
Aperitivo
Campari
Cider
Cocktail Bitters
Cocktail Mixer
Cocktail Muscat
Cocktail Shakers
Cordial
Curacao
Fruit Juice
Garnishes
Mead and Tonic Wine
Muscat
Pernod
Puree
Soft Drinks
Spirits Mixer
Syrup
Dessert Wine
Argentinian Dessert Wine
Australian Dessert Wine
Chile Dessert Wine
Drambuie
English Dessert Wine
French Dessert Wine
Fruit and Ginger Wine
German Dessert Wine
Hungarian Dessert Wine
Italian Dessert Wine
Madeira and Marsala
New Zealand Dessert WIne
Portugal Dessert Wine
Sauterne
Sherry
South African Dessert Wine
Spanish Dessert Wine
Vermouth
Liquor
Absinthe
Armagnac
Baileys
Brandy
Cachaca
Calvados
Cassis
Cognac
Cognac and Brandy
Cointreau
Eau De Vie
Gin
Gin & Genever
Gran Marnier
Grappa
Irish Liqueur
Irish Vodka
Japanese
Liqueur
Pisco
Poteen
RTD'S (Ready to Drink)
Rum
Sake
Sambuca
Schnapps
Speciality
Spirit
Tequila
Tequila & Mescal
Vodka
Port Wine
French Port Wine
Portuguese Port Wine
Portuguese White Port
Ruby Port Wine
Tawny Port Wine
Red Wine
American Red Wine
Argentina Red Wine
Australian Red Wine
Austrian Red Wine
Bulgarian Red Wine
Chile Red Wine
English Red Wine
French Red Wine
Georgia Red Wine
German Red Wine
Greek Red Wine
Hungarian Red Wine
Italian Red Wine
New Zealand Red Wine
Portuguese Red Wine
South African Red Wine
Spanish Red Wine
Uruguay Red Wine
Rosé Wine
American Rosé Wine
Australian Rosé Wine
Chile Rosé Wine
English Rosé Wine
French Rosé Wine
German Rosé Wine
Italian Rosé Wine
New Zealand Rosé Wine
Portuguese Rosé Wine
South African Rosé Wine
Spanish Rosé Wine
Sparkling Wine
American Sparkling Wine
Argentina Sparkling Wine
Cava
Cyprus Sparkling Wine
French Sparkling Wine
German Sparkling Wine
Italian Sparkling Wine
Prosecco
Sekt
South African Sparkling Wine
Spanish Sparkling Wine
Walisisch Sparkling Wine
Whisky
Blended Malt Whisky
Blended Whisky
Bourbon & USA Whiskey
Grain Whisky
Irish Whiskey
Other Whisky
Scotch Whisky
Single Malt Whisky
White Wine
American White Wine
Argentina White Wine
Australian White Wine
Austrian White Wine
Chile White Wine
English White Wine
French White Wine
Georgia White Wine
German White Wine
Greek White Wine
Hungarian White Wine
Italian White Wine
New Zealand White Wine
Slovakian White Wine
South African White Wine
Spanish White Wine
Wine
Chile Wine
English Wine
Exclusive Wines
Fine Wine
French Wine
German Wine
Italian Wine
New Zealand Wine
Port Sherry Madeira
Portugal Wine
Spanish Wine
Wine Gifts
Beer Gifts
Case
Gift Packaging
Spirit Gifts
Voucher
Wine & Champagne Gifts

Wine Tours

5/5 (3)

Give this page a High Five!

Save up to 20%

Get our newsletter with the promotional code, and save a lot of money!

Online Shopping and World's Best Wines

Save up to 20%

Receive our newsletter and get the latest news, promotional codes and freebies

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This